April is Testicular Cancer Awareness Month

April is Testicular Cancer Awareness Month and to spread the word, we’re sharing our Balls for free on YouTube

 

WATCH the unblurred, unbleeped, balls out version here.

In the first episode of Balls we get an introduction to testicles and what makes them weird, attractive and curious to different people.  We will also meet men who have had testicular cancer and faced the removal of one or both balls.

 

Balls is a one hour documentary that covers every angle and topic we could brainstorm to do with testicles.  From sex and sports to health concerns like sperm count, torsion and bringing attention to Testicular Cancer Awareness Month we’ve left no jock-strap unexplored. 

 

Over the next few weeks during Testicular Cancer Awareness Month we will be releasing a new short video from our Balls documentary every few days.  So watch along with us as we explore all things balls related in this special men’s health series.

 

Please share with your friends, post on your social and encourage your buddies to check their balls – or lend a helping hand – it could save a life!

 

Testicular Cancer Awareness month beach balls

 

 

And because it’s Testicular Cancer Awareness Month this is a great opportunity for you to check your own balls!  Do it while watching our documentary, Balls.  

 

Honestly, we encourage you to pull them out, roll them around, check for any oddities or things you haven’t seen or felt before.  This is important and something you should be doing regularly.  If you do discover new firmness, a lump, or anything strange – book an appointment with your doctor or go to a walk-in clinic to get them checked by a professional right away.  When it comes to Testicular Cancer – early detection really can save your life.

 

Testicular Examination

Self-examination can save your life. Here’s how to give your balls a regular self-check for suspicious signs:

Testicular Cancer Awareness Month self exam diagram

 

 

1. Do your assessment right after a warm bath or shower, when the scrotum is relaxed.

 

2. Stand before a mirror. Survey for scrotal swelling.

 

3. Support your testicles with your palm. Note their size and weight. This will help you discern any future changes.

 

4. Examine each testicle separately. Place your second and third fingers under one testicle with your thumb on top. Gently roll the testicle between your thumb and fingers to feel for any irregularities. Repeat on the other testicle.

 

5. Find the epididymis, the soft, rope-like structure on the back of each testicle. By identifying the epididymis, you won’t mistake it for a lump.

 

See your doctor if you note any questionable signs, especially those lasting longer than two weeks.

 

Read the interview with Balls director, Nico Stagias, in our special April series for Testicular Cancer Awareness Month.

 

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