Testicle Implants

Testicle Implants

After losing a testicle (or two), due to cancer, infection, injury or torsion, do you consider getting testicle implants?  What if you are a trans-man?  According to our documentary subjects, the opinions vary and are split down the middle.

To replace, or not to replace.  This is the question.
 
In the case of Matt Perry, who lost his testicle to testicular torsion, he has no interest in replacing the excided ball with a testicle implants.  Now in his fifties, Matt had his ball removed in his early twenties because the twisted testicle had cut off all blood supply to his left nut rendering it dead.  Not only is testicular torsion a medical emergency but it is also very difficult to diagnose.  If the diagnosis and “un-twisting” is not made within the first 8 hours, the testicle will likely be lost.  

Matt’s trauma of undergoing an orchiectomy over 25 years ago is so great, that the thought of having to undergo surgery once again to have testicle implants is even further traumatizing. Besides, he is much older now and in a long-term committed relationship with a partner who is comfortable and supportive of Matt’s body.  Matt jokes, “If you could click your fingers and have testicle implants with no effort required, I would probably do that”. Sadly, it is not that simple.
 

Siavash, on the other hand, who also lost a testicle to torsion in more recent years, is definitely considering re-balancing his body with testicle implants.  As a younger man in his late twenties, he would like his body to look more symmetrical.  At the moment, he is researching clinics and doctors.
 
For Peter Bovolaneas, who lost both testicles to cancer, it was a no brainer.  He was thankful for the modern day medical technology and elected to get 2 prosthetic testicle implants.  Peter is a remarkable human being who has such a great sense of humor and amazing coping skills.

Sometimes when he is out at the bars, he will approach acquaintances (who do not know his testicular history) and ask them to flick his balls.  If he doesn’t flinch, they buy him a drink; if Peter flinches, he buys the drink.  It’s a win-win situation for tipsy Peter, leaving the “flicker” scratching his or her head.  

It should also be noted that Peter, who presents as a VERY masculine/muscular man, can no longer produce testosterone because both testicles were removed due to cancer. Because of this fact, Peter must inject himself with testosterone every 2 weeks to maintain sex drive, bone mass, muscle mass and mental health.  He humorously accepts this shot in the buttocks as his “pain in the ass”.

Peter takes testosterone because without biologically intact testicles, as a man he needs it.  This is different than when men with functioning testicles take testosterone for purely aesthetic reasons.

The decision to get testicle implants after the required removal of one or both balls really comes down to choice and comfort.  And as Maggie Cassella jokes, “I’m not going to judge a guy for getting a fake ball any more than I’m going to judge a woman for getting a fake boob. It’s your choice and we have the technology!”

testicle implants sizingDifferent sizes of testicle implants are measured against the patient’s real testicles to get as close a match as possible.
 testicle-implants-sizing-indianapolis-dr-barry-eppley
There are different types of prosthetic testicle implants.  The ultimate goal is to match the prosthetic as much as possible to the remaining, natural testicle.  Testicular prostheses are made of silicone gel or saline (salt water) with a silicone rubber covering.  The surgeon makes a small incision in the lower groin where the prosthesis is inserted and then placed in the empty scrotum and secured with a stitch, or suture. You can usually go home the same day of the surgery.  Often testicular prosthesis surgery can be done at the same time as the orchiectomy, or during a later surgery.  It all depends on what the patient wants.

As a trans-man, Carey is not interested in getting prosthetic testicle implants.  His genitals do not define his masculinity, though he jokingly claims to have “psychic balls”.  Interestingly enough, once Carey started to take testosterone, his genitals started to change.  His clitoris and labia started to grow, so much so that he often feels as though he has a penis and balls.

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Testicular Self-Exam video with Johnny Rapid

testicular self-exam video

Learn how to do a monthly step-by-step check-up on your balls with this NSFW testicular self-exam video starring Johnny Rapid.

We have been exploring all things related to Balls and if the topic interests you, I invite you to read some of our other articles and watch the documentary for further insight.

Some of the topics we look at include the importance of etymology, that is being specific in the words we use, like in the case of gender reassignment and gender confirmation.

Beyond testicular cancer, we discover lesser known complications a person can have with testicles such as testicular torsion or varicocele. 

We even speak with some drag queens to discover just where the balls go when they tuck.

It’s easy to do so there’s no excuses!   Just follow along in this NSFW testicular self-exam video and do what Johnny does.

JOHNNY RAPID: My balls are my moneymaker so it’s important that I check them at least once a month to make sure they’re in prime condition.

So, how do I check that my balls are ready to play and stay that way? Pull your pants down guys and go through the steps with me to make sure your balls are healthy and strong.

Check your testicles just after you’ve had a bath or shower. When the muscles in the scrotum are relaxed making it easier for you to feel any lumps, growths or tenderness.

Stand in front of a mirror. Look for any swelling on the skin of your scrotum. Hold your scrotum in your hands and feel the size and weight of each testicle. Don’t worry if one ball is a little bigger or one hangs lower than the other that’s normal.

Feel each ball and roll it between your thumb and finger. It should feel smooth, it’s normal to feel a soft, tender tube towards the back of each testicle, that’s where your sperm are made. You shouldn’t feel any pain when checking your testicles.

Once you get to know your balls keep an eye out for any changes If you detect a change, don’t freak out just see a doctor as soon as possible.

My balls have stayed the same since my last self exam so that means I’m ready to go to work. Make sure you check your balls at least once a month and if you notice any changes go see your doctor right away.

If you would like to know more, please check out the film, Balls.

You can also watch Balls on Vimeo, Amazon, or on the Border2Border Store.

Working with Johnny Rapid to make the Testicular Self-Exam video was definitely fun but it wasn’t a ‘one take wonder’.  Take a look at some of the goof ball antics that we went through to get the video.

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Varicocele – a unique kind of testicle

Adam Graham varicocele

Like varicose veins in the legs, varicocele is an abnormal enlargement of the veins in the scrotum.

Let’s be honest, we are body obsessed, even when it comes to our balls.  Balls “should” be oval shaped and smooth.  When they don’t conform to the norm, we worry, we question why, we keep quiet and hope no one notices.  “Let’s have a beer and forget about it”.
 
Like varicose veins in the legs, varicocele is an abnormal enlargement of the veins in the scrotum. Often painful, varicocele might even cause infertility, as we discovered in our documentary, Balls, as in the case of our courageous documentary subject Adam.  

Adam Graham varicocele

After taking part in a medical study during his undergraduate degree, Adam donated some of his semen and found out that, in his own words, his “sperm was dead”.  Adam jokingly compares his left testicle to an “asteroid”, because it looks enlarged and misshapen.  Aside from infertility, other symptoms of testicular varicocele might include: an aching or dragging like pain, heaviness in the testicle, shrinking of the testicle and benign prostatic hyperplasia (noncancerous increase in size of the prostate).

Get to know your balls. Go step-by-step watching this NSFW testicular self-exam video with Johnny Rapid.


Adam considered surgery to remove the varicose veins in his scrotum, but decided against it because he is a gay man that is not interested in having children.  Though at times his varicocele is physically sensitive to touch or sexual play, he has lived with this condition for most of his adult life and doesn’t see the benefit of going under the knife.  He is also in a supportive relationship with his partner Philip who has no issue with Adam’s “misshapen” ball.  Philip loves Adam exactly as he is.  Adam is lucky.

As men, particularly gay men, we are obsessed with our physical presence.  In another episode of Balls we explore the use of anabolic steroids and how men physically transform their bodies through its use with often disastrous side effects.

Jeremy from I'm a Stripper.
Jeremy from I’m a Stripper.

We aspire to a physical ideal that is unattainable. We are constantly and unsuccessfully trying to transform and mutilate our bodies to fit a singular, perfect mold that only exists in some sadistic Greek god’s fantasy.   For more on this explore our documentary STUDlebrity.

I am no exception.  Though to date I have not been on a course of steroids nor have I had any testicular ailments that I am aware of, I did recently remove 12 moles from my torso.  Granted, some of these moles needed to be removed for health reasons, but the majority of them were removed strictly based on aesthetics.  

Nico Stagias - Director of PhotographyI have too many moles and they look ugly. I’ve struggled with my ugly moles all my life and finally decided to do something about it.  I figured, since I was removing 4 moles, why not remove another 8 unsightly, lumpy marks off my body.  While on the operating table and feeling the pull of my skin being sliced off, I started to panic and have regrets.

This didn’t feel good, emotionally and physically. Why am I putting myself though additional trauma for the sake of vanity? I’ve never had any part of my body removed, including my foreskin, of which I am very proud of (I have a lot of foreskin pride and always encourage parents not to mutilate their young baby boys). Now recovering from my minor surgery, in loo of my large moles, I have large unsightly scars in their stead.  Sadly, I’m no closer to this perfect/ flawless body.  In fact, I’m left humbled, a little embarrassed and further flawed.  I’m embarrassed to tell friends and family why I had this procedure done.  I think I’m sticking to the story of having been in a knife fight.  It will make me appear strong and courageous. 😉   So manly!
 
I guess I should have listened to my Greek mother.  She refers to my ugly moles as “beautiful olives”.  Either a mother’s love is blind, or she can see our true physical beauty, no matter how ugly we think we might be.  Vulnerability is beautiful.  Being different is beautiful.  Being flawed is beautiful.  Thanks Mom.  I’ll be sure to have a chat with you next time I’m considering the operation table for elective surgery. 

~ Nico Stagias, Balls director & cinematographer at Border2Border Entertainment.

Dive deeper into the Balls documentary with director Nico Stagias in this interview.

WATCH the unblurred, unbleeped, balls out version of the Balls documentary on Border2Border Entertainment.

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