Brent Ray Fraser – the Penis Painter

Brent Ray Fraser.

Brent Ray Fraser is an artist first and foremost.  Halfway through our Skype interview for the Balls documentary, he proudly boasts that he has been playing with his balls the whole time, and affectionately refers to his testicles as “Tweedledum and Tweedledee”.  He is essentially a little kid who lives in a Silo (aka his “grown up” tree fort) in the middle of no-where British Columbia.  Brent Ray Fraser is inquisitive, engaged and alert. He likes being naked as much and possible and, quite frankly I don’t blame him; he is easy on the eyes.  He is a handsome mama’s boy with an infectious smile and demeanor.   All that, and packaged in a chiseled Greek God’s body to boot!

Brent Ray Fraser
Brent Ray Fraser at home in the Silo

Like I said, easy on the eyes.  
  
Brent Ray Fraser takes his health and physicality very seriously.  About 12 years ago he was diagnosed with kidney disease.  The thought of dying really pushed him to live a healthier life and to pursue his art full time.  He views his body is a living, malleable and sacred sculpture to be used (not abused) to feed his art until his dying breath.


Brent Ray Fraser creates his art thought painting, performance, video and sculpture.  He is a talented renaissance man.  His approach to art is very erotic, but it’s art first, not pornography. When questioned about his sexuality, he is not interested in sexual relationships with people anymore; he only has sex with his art. He is determinedly married to his art and if he could he would legally and happily make that relationship binding in the eyes of the law. He has even coined his own word to describe his sexuality; he is “Artsexual”.  For the time being, I guess he will have to remain single.

Brent Ray Fraser creates a 'nutsack' painting
Brent Ray Fraser creates a ‘nutsack’ painting
Brent Ray Fraser getting intimate with his art
Brent Ray Fraser getting intimate with his art
Brent Ray Fraser creating his nutsack paintings
Brent Ray Fraser creating his nutsack paintings

Brent Ray Fraser uses his entire body to create his artwork.  He is especially inspired to create pieces with his penis and balls.  Yes, that’s right, he paints with his balls.  This may sound unusual, but his “nut-sack” paintings hold a particular sense of pride in his mind.  Essentially, Brent Ray Fraser applies paint to his scrotum with a brush and then presses his scrotal sack onto a canvas.  The effect is quite lovely, textural and unusual. To Brent Ray Fraser, these nut-sack paintings are very personal and refer to them as “self-portraits that are having a conversation with art history”. 

By Nickolaos Stagias

Get up close and personal with Brent Ray Fraser in our documentaries, Balls and I’m a Stripper: Digital Dancer.

Brent explores performance art as an exotic dancer and cam model in the miniseries I’m a Stripper.

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Testicle Implants

Testicle Implants

After losing a testicle (or two), due to cancer, infection, injury or torsion, do you consider getting testicle implants?  What if you are a trans-man?  According to our documentary subjects, the opinions vary and are split down the middle.

To replace, or not to replace.  This is the question.
 
In the case of Matt Perry, who lost his testicle to testicular torsion, he has no interest in replacing the excided ball with a testicle implants.  Now in his fifties, Matt had his ball removed in his early twenties because the twisted testicle had cut off all blood supply to his left nut rendering it dead.  Not only is testicular torsion a medical emergency but it is also very difficult to diagnose.  If the diagnosis and “un-twisting” is not made within the first 8 hours, the testicle will likely be lost.  

Matt’s trauma of undergoing an orchiectomy over 25 years ago is so great, that the thought of having to undergo surgery once again to have testicle implants is even further traumatizing. Besides, he is much older now and in a long-term committed relationship with a partner who is comfortable and supportive of Matt’s body.  Matt jokes, “If you could click your fingers and have testicle implants with no effort required, I would probably do that”. Sadly, it is not that simple.
 

Siavash, on the other hand, who also lost a testicle to torsion in more recent years, is definitely considering re-balancing his body with testicle implants.  As a younger man in his late twenties, he would like his body to look more symmetrical.  At the moment, he is researching clinics and doctors.
 
For Peter Bovolaneas, who lost both testicles to cancer, it was a no brainer.  He was thankful for the modern day medical technology and elected to get 2 prosthetic testicle implants.  Peter is a remarkable human being who has such a great sense of humor and amazing coping skills.

Sometimes when he is out at the bars, he will approach acquaintances (who do not know his testicular history) and ask them to flick his balls.  If he doesn’t flinch, they buy him a drink; if Peter flinches, he buys the drink.  It’s a win-win situation for tipsy Peter, leaving the “flicker” scratching his or her head.  

It should also be noted that Peter, who presents as a VERY masculine/muscular man, can no longer produce testosterone because both testicles were removed due to cancer. Because of this fact, Peter must inject himself with testosterone every 2 weeks to maintain sex drive, bone mass, muscle mass and mental health.  He humorously accepts this shot in the buttocks as his “pain in the ass”.

Peter takes testosterone because without biologically intact testicles, as a man he needs it.  This is different than when men with functioning testicles take testosterone for purely aesthetic reasons.

The decision to get testicle implants after the required removal of one or both balls really comes down to choice and comfort.  And as Maggie Cassella jokes, “I’m not going to judge a guy for getting a fake ball any more than I’m going to judge a woman for getting a fake boob. It’s your choice and we have the technology!”

testicle implants sizingDifferent sizes of testicle implants are measured against the patient’s real testicles to get as close a match as possible.
 testicle-implants-sizing-indianapolis-dr-barry-eppley
There are different types of prosthetic testicle implants.  The ultimate goal is to match the prosthetic as much as possible to the remaining, natural testicle.  Testicular prostheses are made of silicone gel or saline (salt water) with a silicone rubber covering.  The surgeon makes a small incision in the lower groin where the prosthesis is inserted and then placed in the empty scrotum and secured with a stitch, or suture. You can usually go home the same day of the surgery.  Often testicular prosthesis surgery can be done at the same time as the orchiectomy, or during a later surgery.  It all depends on what the patient wants.

As a trans-man, Carey is not interested in getting prosthetic testicle implants.  His genitals do not define his masculinity, though he jokingly claims to have “psychic balls”.  Interestingly enough, once Carey started to take testosterone, his genitals started to change.  His clitoris and labia started to grow, so much so that he often feels as though he has a penis and balls.

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Drag Queens teach the art of Tucking

Donnarama

Tucking is the art of making your testicles “miraculously” disappear.  But just how does a drag queen make that happen?  Where do they go?

Drag queens and butch lesbians were at the forefront of the gay liberation movement at Stonewall.  Their queer visibility made them conscripted soldiers for a movement in which the majority of its citizenry were invisible/voiceless gay men and women who were mostly in the closet.  Who would have thought that sissies and bull dykes would come to our community’s rescue?  Our militant forefathers and foremothers had serious balls.  And quite frankly, it’s the visible and vocal queers of today that continue to challenge gender, sexuality and sex as our modern day queer warriors.

And that’s exactly what drag artist Barbie Jo Bontemps says in our documentary Balls, ”It takes a lot of balls to be a drag queen!” In the bigger picture, she is certainly echoing our queer herstory, but at that very moment she is specifically referring to the physical, testicular pains that drag queens must undergo to realize their gender illusion.  Tucking your balls is common practice for many a modern drag artist. Whether you are using tight underwear, a gaffe (pulling all your junk back with a sock) or duck tape for tucking, the end result is the same; your testicles “miraculously” disappear.  
 ucking BarbieJoBontemps
To make one’s testicles disappear, you are essentially pushing your balls back into your body’s natural cavities.  It’s kinda uncomfortable, but not overly painful.  Unlike Barbie, Donnarama is not overly enthusiastic about tucking, “I hate 3 things.  I hate shaving my face, shaving my back and TUCKING”!  It’s not easy being gorgeous, but sometimes a girl’s got to do, what a girl’s got to do. Interestingly, this idea of tucking, like wearing high heels or make-up, speaks to the discomfort that many women often endure to also realize the illusion of gender that has been imposed on them by the heterosexual cis-male gaze.
 Tucking 1
Back in my salad days, I used to do a lot of what I would call “clown” drag.  My goal was to look fun and vaguely girly.  For me, drag was a multi-layered tool to play with gender and gender expectations.  That said, I never tucked or gaffed, in fact, sometimes I wouldn’t even shave.  I liked to both shock and amuse my immediate audience. I was never trying to “pass” as a “real” woman.  Some drag queens refer to this as “fishy”, a term that I’m not particularly comfortable with. Part of this discomfort stems from an inherent misogyny of cis-men playing with female gender without any real ownership or consequence.  If things get too “real”, the drag queen can assume the privilege of being a cis-male, whereas women are systematically compromised without any escape.  They suffer physically, emotionally and economically because of their gender.  Perhaps it is women who have the “real” balls after all.
 Tucking Donnarama
Barbie and Donnarama offer a great counterpoint and levity in our documentary Balls.  Their playful, off-the-cuff banter help bridge the conversations around testicular health and men’s health in general, both physical and emotional. Because of how men are generally socialized, they are not having open, honest and vulnerable discussions about their own personal health and how to ask for help.  In its own small ways I hope Balls, with the help of Barbie and Donnarama, opens that door.

~ Nico Stagias, Director of Photography at Border2Border Entertainment

Grab your Balls and hold on!  Let’s discover everything you never knew about your nuts.

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